Recent Profiles

To know the people we care for and the people who make that care happen is to know Health Care for the Homeless. Our promise to you: Getting to know them will make your life just a little bit richer.

Throughout his life, Thomas Riddle was passionate about music and cars. These things brought him happiness. But from the time he was a child, something was missing. It took a heroin habit and homelessness at the age of 50 for him to identify what that was. In his own words, Thomas talks about the importance of love.

“I got a late Christmas gift this year.” That’s how Mary Beth describes the moment her therapist, Jill, told her she had secured a dental appointment for her at our downtown clinic.

“What do you call a bear with no teeth? A gummy bear!” Expect a big smile and a joke like this one whenever you see Stephen Davidson. “I’ve got to learn a new way of living. A new way of dealing with things. It’s the first time I’ve experienced medical difficulties. First time I’ve been in a wheelchair. First time I can’t work. But I might as well have a good attitude about it.”

Walt Mell’s blue eyes droop just a little but they have a twinkle to them. His whole face smiles when he talks. The last 20 or so of his 53 years have been hard. But what you notice right away about Walt is his levity. He goes to the ER for his regular nosebleeds, he says, and he comes to the Health Care for the Homeless clinic in Baltimore County to bring cookies to the staff and "fatten them up."

Donnell Gamble never knew his birth parents, but for most of his young years he knew stability. Then one day it was gone. Donnell grew up in the foster system until he was 8, when he was adopted. For the next decade, he lived in West Baltimore with his adoptive mother. He graduated on time from a small public high school that emphasized college prep. But the importance his school placed on college did not translate into a plan for Donnell for life after school. 

“In 1985 I was charged with the murder of a law enforcement officer. I was given a 20-year sentence. I did 16 years and five months. All those years I lost family members. On April 12, 2002, I came home and my neighborhood was gone. Hollander Ridge. I have been bouncing around from house to house with friends. I’m not going to give up. I’m going to continue to look for a job, I’m 47 years old.

Damien was a young father and high school teacher when his wife was killed by a drunk driver. In the wake of the tragedy, Damien experienced further devastating setbacks. He became unemployed and lost his health insurance and his home. Stomach pains led him to Health Care for the Homeless where he was offered the support and care he needed.

An escape from domestic violence in summer 2014 quickly landed 22-year-old Olivia and her young daughter, Caroline, on Baltimore’s streets. With her mother no longer living, her father in prison and her siblings struggling with their own challenges, Olivia had no safety net and nowhere to go.

As a young girl, Kassie Carter saw first-hand the impact of poor dental care. “I knew there needed to be an awareness of dental care in our family, because no one had any teeth.

For many years, Eliza cycled in and out of hospitals, jails and the street. For the last two-plus years she has been safely housed, and in the last eight months, she has not been admitted or incarcerated once. Her home, which she secured through the Supportive Housing at Health Care for the Homeless, is the symbolic center of her life.