The winter shelter status is ACTIVE Saturday, February 16 through Tuesday, February 19 at 8 a.m. Extra shelter space will be available for single adults and families. Find more details here

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Homeward is here!

10.24.17

It’s been a busy year here at Health Care for the Homeless so far—we’ve continued to grow our staff, developed some new partnerships, rolled out a strategic plan to guide us for the next four years—and we even increased the size of one of our clinics by almost five times! And we’re not done yet.

We thought long and hard about how to best share all the exciting work we’re doing with you, our community, on a regular basis. And this month, we launch a quarterly Health Care for the Homeless newsletter, Homeward, to do just that.

Homeward will allow you and fellow readers to gain deeper insight into our community—our clients, staff, volunteers, donors, partners—and the work we do together each day to prevent and end homelessness. Each issue will include stories about members of our community, programs we offer through our clinics, upcoming events and much, much more. 

Interested in receiving a copy of Homeward by mail? Sign up here!  

Questions and/or feedback about Homeward? Email Kate Leisner.

More Recent News


02.04.19

On Saturday, February 2, 800+ spectacularly dressed chocolate lovers filed into the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront for the sweetest night of the year. By the end of the night, our incredible Health Care for the Homeless community raised enough money to give 1,000 of people the care they need to regain health, hope and opportunity.

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01.24.19

Brandon Berryain doesn’t want his position on our Board of Directors to be a status symbol. For him, it’s an opportunity to ground the Board with his lived experience and encourage other clients to get involved. Brandon says, “As much as being a leader matters, it’s being an example that matters more.”

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01.24.19

HIV/HCV Care Associate Adrienne Washington talks testing and education

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01.24.19

Mary* was worried. She didn’t have time to be sick. And she couldn’t leave her kids at the local shelter to find out why she wasn’t feeling well.

“If you’re in a shelter, you can’t control when you go to sleep, when you wake up or when you eat,” says Amber Richert, DNP, Nurse Practitioner. “When your health is another thing you can’t control, it can be really scary.”

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