Our News

What's happening in our Health Care for the Homeless community...

01.24.19

HIV/HCV Care Associate Adrienne Washington talks testing and education

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01.24.19

Mary* was worried. She didn’t have time to be sick. And she couldn’t leave her kids at the local shelter to find out why she wasn’t feeling well.

“If you’re in a shelter, you can’t control when you go to sleep, when you wake up or when you eat,” says Amber Richert, DNP, Nurse Practitioner. “When your health is another thing you can’t control, it can be really scary.”

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01.24.19

Helping kids learn to brush means a lifetime of healthy smiles. Dentists recommend brushing your teeth for two minutes. That can seem like an eternity for a kid. Just ask Dr. Parita Patel, Dental Director at Health Care for the Homeless.

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Kara is fighting for a healthier future—thanks to you.
01.24.19

When you first meet Kara Demindes, you’re struck by her unshakable resolve. Born at just 24 weeks, Kara spent the first nine months of her life in the hospital, fighting to survive. “I held on,” she says. “And I’m still holding on today.”

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01.16.19

Maybe you've heard of the Point-in-Time or PIT count before. Formerly every two years, but now annually, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires communities to help identify individuals, families and youth experiencing homelessness in each jurisdiction.

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01.08.19

After over a decade and many different positions at Johns Hopkins University, we are excited that Wynona China is joining our Health Care for the Homeless family. 

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12.21.18

You’re the reason Vanessa can see a dentist at all. Over the last year, she has found relief from pain and recovered her 1,000-watt grin because of the care your gifts make possible—care she can't get anywhere else.

Like Vanessa, hundreds of people each month come to our dental clinics thinking they'll never smile again. Dental pain prevents them from sleeping, eating and talking.

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12.21.18

The 2019 Chocolate Affair is Saturday, February 2. We've pulled together this list of the top reasons to get yourself to the sweetest night in town!

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12.13.18

When you grow up poor in Baltimore, the odds aren’t in your favor. Your life expectancy lags 20 years behind people from wealthy neighborhoods. You’re more likely to get diabetes and heart disease. You’re also more likely to experience trauma and suffer from behavioral health issues.

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12.10.18

Looking out at a room of 13 freshmen from the Mercy High Women in Medicine Program, Chief Quality Officer Tonii Geden said, "Diversity in health care is important—it makes a huge difference in how we move forward." We see 10,000 people a year, all from different walks of life, making a staff full of diverse identities, backgrounds and experiences critical. 

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